Lightly salted cucumbers

Submitted by Nobility_Cuisine on Sun, 06/26/2005 - 12:20.
Ingredients:

2 lb small unripe cucumbers
1 small garlic bulb
(optional) ½ hot pepper
5 tablespoon sea salt
(optional) 7-8 currant leaves
(optional) 7-8 cherry leaves
1 bunch of dill
1 ½ qt water

Method:

Wash cucumbers, and cut their ends.
Cut pepper and garlic to stripes.
To salt anything, use glass or glazed dish.
Divide all ingredients except water and salt by 3-5 parts (it depends on dish size).
Put first part of pepper and garlic stripes, currant and cherry leaves, shredded dill on the bottom of dish.
Boil water and salt in other dish, set aside.
Put ¼ of all cucumbers, put over them the next part of currant leaves, pepper stripes, garlic stripes, leaves, and shredded dill.
Repeat 2-4 times, until all cucumbers and greens are in the dish.
Pour over hot salt water.
Set overnight in the room temperature.
Cucumbers are ready.

Note: Lightly salted cucumbers are one of most favorite summer dishes; best of all is to eat them with boiled or baked new harvest potato. You can use cut in peaces cucumbers, they are ready in 2 hours.

“Dranic” - potato pancakes

Submitted by Russian_Cuisine on Sun, 06/26/2005 - 12:15.
Ingredients (10-12 pancakes):

1 lb potato, washed, peeled, and shredded
2 tablespoon all-purpose flour
½ teaspoon salt
(optional) 1-2 eggs

Method:

Mix all ingredients.
Preheat lightly greased skillet to medium heat.
Put mix on the skillet by table spoon or measure spoon.
Bake until lover side has light brown color, turn, and bake 2-2.5 minutes.
Serve with sour cream, vegetable salsa, or as a garnish for meat or fish.

Note: One of peculiarities of Russian cuisine is flexibility in the ingredients choice.
You can replace potato with zucchini, or shredded, steamed, and cooled carrots, any kind of cabbage, or other vegetable. You can add or not add eggs and spices.

A notice to webmasters

Submitted by Nobility_Cuisine on Thu, 06/16/2005 - 22:53.
The recipes on this blog are published under Creative Commons license. That means that you can grab and publish them on your sites as long as you give the proper credit to me. Keeping the signature in the end of each recipe with the link will do just fine.

And if you are an editor of a women’s magazine or other printed publication, you are welcome as well. Just include the signature with a visible URL when using my recipes. Also notice, that the Creative Commons license used on this blog allows commercial use of the recipes.

A notice to webmasters

Submitted by Russian_Cuisine on Thu, 06/16/2005 - 22:48.
The recipes on this blog are published under Creative Commons license. That means that you can grab and publish them on your sites as long as you give the proper credit to me. Keeping the signature in the end of each recipe with the link will do just fine.

And if you are an editor of a women’s magazine or other printed publication, you are welcome as well. Just include the signature with a visible URL when using my recipes. Also notice, that the Creative Commons license used on this blog allows commercial use of the recipes.

Recipes To Treat Your Family Like Nobility

Submitted by Nobility_Cuisine on Mon, 06/13/2005 - 18:30.
Hi, my name is Michelle.

Russian Cuisine

Submitted by Russian_Cuisine on Mon, 06/13/2005 - 18:24.
Hi, my name is Michelle and I will share with you here authentic recipes of the millennium-old Russian cuisine. When I started to look into the matter, I found that for some reason, Russian cuisine is not really represented in the United States. One of the reasons that I could guess, is that Russians coming to the United States are usually well educated and make a very nice living as professionals. They simply have no reason to open cheap restaurants on every corner and popularize their national recipes.

About this site

This site is devoted a millennium old Russian cuisine. The main content of the site is recipes located on two blogs.

Why two? When working on the concept of this site I faced a problem. Say, Vienna Steak, as the name hints, is actually from Vienna, that is from Austria. However, it was very popular among Russian nobility for centuries.

The problem was that Russian cuisine consists of two parts: the cuisine of people and the cuisine of nobility. Russian nobility was very well integrated into the Europe and shared the same cuisine with the nobility of Germany, France, Austria, Italy, Spain, and Great Britain. This sharing often occurred in many forms including sharing chief cooks. For example, the chief cook of count Stroganoff (ever tried "beef stroganoff"?) worked before him for Count de Talleyrand, and before him for the Queen of the British Empire.

So, the cuisine of people is the real authentic Russian cuisine. The cuisine of nobility is the European cream of the crop recipes shared between nobility of the Old World for centuries. Hence two blogs.

So, here we are. Enjoy and Bon Appetite!